Piano day (2h)

  • Modal studies
    • Harmonising Mixolydian mode with shells (3-7-9) — C, F, Bb, Eb, Ab, Db
    • Harmonising Dorian mode with shells (3-7-9) — C, F, Bb, Eb
  • Improvisation
    • Lydian pentatonic in all keys over major chords in 7-3-6 shells
    • Recap minor blues scale
    • Harmonising Mixolydian mode with block chords & 7-3-5 shells in LH & runs starting on each new scale degree in RH (C-D-E-F…, D-E-F-G…, F-G-A-Bb…, etc.)
    • Same for Dorian
  • Comping
    • Free comping over “Worth the Wait” in Eb (just chords & focus on voice leading)
    • “Worth the Wait” in C — block chords in LH, chord scales in RH

Bass day (1h 40m)

  • Technical / Experimental
    • Playing Hanon piano exercises on bass! This is awesome!!! (Just #6 from the 1st book)
  • Walking bass
    • Worth the Wait in C, Eb and F (all inversions, 7-1-3-5 permutation)
  • Pick / Rhythm
    • Famous Bass Lines, Line #8: 70 to 90bpm

Observations

WOW!!! I just tried it out of pure curiosity and it turned out to be a completely mind-blowing exercises. The cool things about Hanon exercises are that they all start deep in bass clef (which means you won’t need to bother adapting them for your instrument) and they’re pretty much all in C — which means you can TRANSPOSE THE SH*T OUT OF THEM. And yes, they are absolutely mathematical, and you don’t have to read through the whole sheet once you’ve got the logic. Of course, the coolest thing is that they feel very uncommon (because they’re meant to be played on piano!), and even the simplest could be pretty tricky on bass — both in terms of fingering and harmonically. On the other hand, transposing them on piano is a huge P. I. T. A., whereas on the bass you can do it pretty much on the fly once the pattern is clear! Yuppie! Okay, so I’m going to do it every time now, just like I do on piano — and we’ll see how it goes!

Piano day (2h)

  • Modal studies
    • Modes of Melodic minor (all modes in C, without click, just getting familiar)
    • Harmonisation
      • Melodic minor (1st mode)
      • Dorian b2 (2nd mode)
    • Mixing / borrowing
      • Mixing Dorian with Dorian b2 (in the parent key of C)
        • i7 — IV7 / i7 — IV7 — bIImaj7+5
  • Imporvisation
    • Minor Bebop scale over Dorian progression with b2 (IVmaj7 — i7)
    • Exotic scale study
      • Lydian pentatonic (in C)
      • Mela Vagadhisvari (Minor Bebop without passing tone, in fact — it’s just the name that makes it sound fancy 😆)

Observations

Next time, I need to equally geek out on bass 🤓

Piano day (2h)

  • Voicing skills
    • Cycling major 7ths: 7-3-5 to 3-7-9 and backwards
    • Cycling minor 7ths: same
    • Cycling dominant 7ths: same idea
    • Minor to dominant (7-3-5 to 3-7-9)
    • Minor to dominant (3-7-9 to 7-3-6)
  • Modes of harmonic minor
    • H. M. scales with both hands in all keys
    • 2nd mode of H. M.: harmonising C & F scales
    • Improv in 2nd mode (keys of F and Bb)

Observations

I should’ve got to this before! Harmonic minor modes are literally a whole new world! I definitely used these chords and colours before, but finally knowing where they come from is so revealing and — well, it just speeds up the writing process so much when you actually know how things work. I’ve been told this during my study in the music school and I repeatedly find more and more evidence to this. Knowing the math is very helpful!