Bass player’s introduction to noise music

Just recently I have released a new piece that was initially written for the electric bass, but then somehow segued into the whole new world of noise music that I’ve been circling around for a long time.

First of all, here’s the score:

Screenshot 2019-05-10 at 10.05.07 PM.png

You can also take a listen to it here:

And / or watch a music video for it:

Finding passing sounds for your music is almost like scoring a moving image — only on a different level. Just like certain harmonies and modalities fit certain characters and scenes in a movie, there are very specific types of sounds that are appropriate for specific melodic figures and progressions. And if you find them, and process them, and strip them of the unnecessary parts, and put them exactly where they belong in your theme — you may end up with a whole new understory that complements the piece and adds a new dimension to it.

And after you’re done with this part, you can go ahead and add a visual, effectively leaving the three-dimensional world.

I’m definitely going to explore this realm further and keep you posted about it! 🤙🏻

Bass day (1h 45m)

Finally a bass session! 😃

Warm-up

  • Be My Love in C
    • Basic Latin (1-5, 3rds, some chromatic passages)

Scale studies

  • Harmonic minor in all keys
  • Harmonic minor dissection (bass variation): figure #1 — sheet music coming soon
  • Harmonic minor dissection (bass variation): figure #2

Reading

  • Hrabe etude #7

Pick + technique

  • Famous blues lines by Larry McCabe — figure #5 (C, D)

Observations

If there’s one thing in this multiverse that can make me instantly get back on my track and feel great again — it’s sight reading on bass. I was missing it so badly!

 

 

Bass day (1h 40m)

Scale studies

  • Cycling Dorian alternating with Phrygian: focus on accidentals in each key

Chord tones

  • Extensions
    • 9ths over minor chords in all keys
    • Major 11ths in all keys (over major 7th chords)
    • Same with harmonic 10ths
    • Mixing harmonic 10ths with 11ths and 9ths (over minor chords)

Reading

  • Hrabe contrabass etude #5
  • John Patitucci, Melodic Etudes For Acoustic And Electric Bass — C Major

Bass day (1h 40m)

Walking bass / chord tones

  • All Of Me in C free run
  • 1st inversion + 2nd inversion over All Of Me (descending) — C, F

Reading

  • John Patitucci Etude in C Major
  • Hrabe #5 in Bb

Observations

When descending down the 2nd inversion from the 3rd (e. g. A7: C# — A—), if you can’t quickly figure out where to go next, it is safe to fall back to the 1st inversion and simply descend from the root (A in this case): A — G — E — C#.

Bass day (1h 45m)

  • Scale studies
    • Scale dissection
      • Minor blues: R, b3-4-#4, 5, 7 (recap)
      • Major bebop
        • R-5, b6-6, 7-R
        • 7-R (below), 4-5, b6-6 (above or below), 7-R (all chromatics) — COOL!
  • Walking bass / chord tones
    • Voice leading / connecting inversions with passing tones (Phil Mann exercise) over All of Me in G
  • Reading
    • Afro Blue
    • Afternoon in Paris
    • Airegin

Observations

Just found another very effective way of internalising a new scale. Instead of going up and down the neck, you can first figure out all chromatic intervals in it and them play only them, memorising their position relative to the root. Semitones are normally the simplest to memorise and visualise on fretboard (like, major 7 below — root), therefore there’s a big chance that you will get familiar with them really quickly, and afterwards it will be much easier to learn the rest of the scale. In the case of major bebop, the chromatics are: 7 below — root, M3 — 4, b6 —6 and 7 — R (above). I played them around the cycle of 4ths in all keys, sometimes playing b6-6 run below — because it is quicker to find — and must say that I’m definitely feeling much more confident with this scale!