Album release, new modal studies coming soon and more

Hey, how is it going folks? A lot of things are happening currently, so I thought it would make sense to write a quick update about it all.

First of all, some new exciting modal studies are coming, I’ve just finished cleaning up sheet music and am going to post them soon — stay tuned 🤙🏻

Second of all, I’ve just dropped a new album that is a compilation of my work during the last year. It was an intense period of my life with me finishing my music studies in California and then flying to Germany, briefly hovering over Europe in a suspended state of which-direction-am-I-going-ness, and finally hopping on my bike to cycle around the Leipzig downtown and city channels. It resulted in a collection of instrumental pieces that don’t necessarily have to coexist on an EP or LP or any kind of release really, but, as it often happens, having zoomed out far enough, I could see the big picture in which they fit very well together.

So, here it is. If you want to give it a spin, feel free to check out the release on the Bandcamp and leave me your feedback.

 

I’m also working on a new piano EP, which is currently in the post-production stage. So, a lot of new stuff on the horizon! Hope you’re enjoying your weekend and not forgetting about practice! 🤓 À plus tard!

Perpetuation — new track & sheet music

Salut! I’ve been busy recently rehearsing and recording a new piece that is called Perpetuation and is inspired by the déplacements that I undertook in recent time.

I often feel that there is a certain — poorly identifiable — substrate that somehow lurks behind everyday pictures. Although at times it does come very close to the surface of the wordable world where you could harpoon it with one right term — especially on those sunny summer weekends when you sit around on an empty tennis court or walk down the street to the supermarket — yet, it never really reveals itself fully, thus leaving you with a bunch of almost-there definitions. I know you know what I am talking about, and that’s exactly why I am going to shut up now and give you the link to the track and sheet music to download 🎼

See you in a practice session!

Download full score as PDF

Reversed stride bass in the context of satisfaction

Okay, first post after a two-week vacation! The best advice I could give to my two-week-younger self? Don’t ever take a goddam break from posting! I should’ve known this trap already, and yet I fell into it just like that. Anyway, on the plus side, I have tons of new sheet music and practice routine ideas waiting in the pipeline now, so expect high activity in the nearest future 👌🏻

Alright, today I wanted to talk about another left hand pattern that is worth exploring after you’ve mastered the broken 10ths and the excitement of mixing them with other diatonic intervallic patterns has started to wane. Reversed stride bass! I found it in the wonderful book Jazz Piano: The Left Hand by Roberto Scivales (which I highly recommend to everyone), got blown away by it and then amended it in order to use it in my own routine.

Reversed stride bass is — well, stride bass played backwards 🤓 Instead of hitting the root in the low register and then following up with a block triad or shell octave or two above, you do the exact opposite. Here’s the exercise that I used to practice this movement:

Screenshot 2019-04-28 at 5.35.25 PM

The right hand here plays rootless voicings with minimal movement voice-leading pattern (7-3-5 → 3-7-9) around the cycle of 4ths. The left hand plays chord shells one octave lower and roots two octaves lower. You may also add root — 5th — root octave up movement to complement the rhythmic figure, but it’s more of an ornament.

You can absolutely play block chords in place of shells with the left hand, but, to my taste, doubling roots just sound too muddy. As always, after cycling that thing, take it to your favourite modal progressions & songs.

Reverse stride may sound a bit weird on its own, so, in order to add some FAT and intensity, you can actually combine it with broken 10ths (1-5-10) and block triads! It might be a bit tricky to get used to, but super fun to practice. Check this out:

Screenshot 2019-04-28 at 5.45.22 PM

Same routine (cycling → modal DNAs → songs).

Just for the hell of it, here’s the (slightly oddly voiced) ii—V—I—IV improv that makes extensive use of the above pattern:

Screenshot 2019-04-28 at 5.48.18 PM.png

I’m definitely not done practicing it yet, so it most likely is going to be one of my priorities in the next sessions. There aren’t too many things as satisfying as hitting the low A after a rather watery sounding 7th chord shell played over another shell, both of which are trying their best to avoid the root 😄 Till later—

Back from vacation!

Alright fellas, it’s been a long vacation — not exactly as productive as I planned it, quite procrastination-filled, I would say rather (although I did practice as normal) — so, now it’s time to go back to theory! Got some exciting stuff prepared, more details soon! I’ll be updating the practice log as well, so make sure to use your time machines and read posts from the past 😄 Till later!